CPAF Receives $40,000 Grant from the John Gogian Family Foundation

Last year, the John Gogian Family Foundation’s capacity-building grant supported CPAF’s all-staff retreat at Toyota USA Automobile Museum.

 

The John Gogian Family Foundation has provided Center for the Pacific Asian Family (CPAF) with a $40,000 general operating grant. This core operating grant will support CPAF’s mission to build healthy and safe communities by addressing the root causes and consequences of family violence and violence against women.

With the Foundation’s support, CPAF will enhance community outreach and engagement strategies to meet its goal of preventing and ending domestic and sexual violence in Asian and Pacific Islander (API) communities.

As CPAF’s dating violence prevention programs for API youth have grown, CPAF has seen a correlating increase in reports of sexual violence in the high schools served. When survivors are provided with safe and trusted spaces, they are able to reach out for support and begin to heal. Funding from the John Gogian Family Foundation will sustain CPAF’s youth leadership programs and provide training to equip community partner organizations to be able to address disclosures from minors and gain knowledge about state laws on mandated reporting.

Additionally, the John Gogian Family Foundation contributed a $2,500 capacity-building grant for staff and Board development purposes. These funds can cover the cost of training beyond annual compliance and routine certification, such as retreats, conferences and workshops.

CPAF appreciates the opportunity to continue its partnership with the Foundation in the movement to end all forms of violence in Southern California and beyond.


Bank of America Contributes $15,000 Grant to CPAF

On June 26, 2018, representatives from Bank of America presented CPAF’s Shelter Program Director, Patima Komolamit, with the grant check.

Bank of America has contributed $15,000 in operating support for CPAF’s services for homeless Asian and Pacific Islander (API) survivors of domestic and sexual violence. The grant will help the low-income, limited English speaking families residing in CPAF’s shelters to increase their economic resources in the upcoming year.

This operating support will sustain and enhance CPAF’s trauma-informed services, which respond to the needs of survivors who have difficulty obtaining jobs due to limited English proficiency, lack of a work history in the United States, and lack of community connections due to years of isolation and abuse. CPAF also offers workshops focused on financial literacy, budgeting and finding jobs, provided in API languages such as Mandarin, Korean and Vietnamese. These resources help survivors exit from the shelter and transition into permanent housing, establishing a safe home for themselves and their children.

CPAF is thankful for Bank of America’s continued support which helps to meet the critical needs of the individuals and families we serve.


Bank of Hope Contributes $20,000 Grant to CPAF

 

CPAF received a $20,000 general operating grant contribution from Bank of Hope to support CPAF’s emergency and transitional housing programs, which shelter and provide counseling and case management services to low- and moderate-income survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault in 30 Asian and Pacific Islander languages and dialects.

 

We are thankful for Bank of Hope’s support which helps CPAF meet the critical needs of the individuals and families we serve. We appreciate partnering with Bank of Hope to build healthy and safe communities and nurture change together.

 


CPAF Receives $75,000 Grant from S. Mark Taper Foundation

Funding to Support Programs for Survivors of Domestic and Sexual Violence

We are thrilled to announce that the S. Mark Taper Foundation has awarded Center for the Pacific Asian Family (CPAF) a $75,000 grant to sustain and enhance its programs for underserved Asian and Pacific Islander (API) survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault.

With the S. Mark Taper Foundation’s support, CPAF will be able to meet the critical needs of the individuals and families we serve during a time of significant organizational growth. CPAF recently integrated with sister DV-organization, Asian Pacific Women’s Center, moved to its new community center location, and is expanding program services.

For 40 years, CPAF has served low-income APIs and offered services in more than 30 languages and dialects to meet the needs of Southern California’s diverse API communities. The Foundation’s essential general operating support will enable CPAF to expand its direct services and capacity to better serve API immigrant survivors of domestic and sexual violence. CPAF’s programs are free of charge and include a 24-hour crisis hotline and intervention services, emergency and transitional shelters, community outreach and engagement, and prevention.

Seventy-five percent of survivors at CPAF’s shelters speak little or no English and have been economically isolated by their abusers, who restricted access to employment, resources and means for economic independence. Almost all (90%) shelter residents are below the federal poverty line, with the majority entering with no income. CPAF’s mission is to build healthy and safe communities by addressing the root causes and consequences of family violence and violence against women. CPAF is committed to meeting the specific cultural and language needs of Asian and Pacific Islander women and their families.

“We’re so appreciative of the S. Mark Taper Foundation’s generous gift, which comes at a particularly exciting time for CPAF,” said CPAF Executive Director, Debra Suh. “As our organization enters its fortieth year of serving the Asian and Pacific Islander community, we’re planning for the next forty years and continuing to engage the community to help end domestic and sexual violence.”

Suh added, “Now, more than ever, we must help immigrants who may fear fleeing their abusers due to their immigration status. Everyone deserves a life free from violence, and CPAF is here to support survivors as they transition from crisis to safety and healing.”

Founded in 1989, the S. Mark Taper Foundation is a private family foundation dedicated to enhancing the quality of people’s lives. CPAF looks forward to partnering with the Foundation to build healthy and safe communities and nurture change together.


A Year in Review: CPAF’s 2017 Annual Report

On behalf of everyone at Center for the Pacific Asian Family, THANK YOU! CPAF would not be able to provide its prevention, intervention, shelter, outreach and community engagement services without the generous support of our funders.

Head over to Resources to view our latest Annual Report for fiscal year 2016-2017.

After more than 17 years as partners serving survivors of domestic violence, CPAF and Asian Pacific Women’s Center (APWC) integrated to enhance our capacity to serve the diverse Asian and Pacific Islander communities of Southern California.

As a unified organization, we look forward to continuing to support survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault through linguistically-appropriate and culturally-specific services. Thank you for your generosity as we embark on our new chapter together.

FY 2016-17 Annual Report Highlights:

– In December 2016, CPAF’s Community Center moved to a larger facility in a more easily-accessible Mid-Wilshire location.

– In December 2016, CPAF completed a comprehensive renovation of its Emergency Shelter facility’s kitchen.

– In March 2017, CPAF integrated with sister agency APWC, adding 24 beds to its Transitional Program.

– This year, CPAF helped lead the movement to increase language access and build capacity in the community, both locally and state-wide.

o The City of Los Angeles selected CPAF to implement a project to increase language access for limited English speaking survivors at partner domestic violence organizations, and to strengthen CPAF’s Language Bank of bilingual volunteers, who support translation and interpretation needs of partner agencies.

o CPAF is one of six partners in the Multi-Year Language Access Resources (MYLAR) Project, which provides state-wide trainings for participants to learn how to adopt a diversity framework, enhance leadership and budget strategies, and increase language access at their workplace, all in reference to serving victims of crime more effectively throughout the state.

– CPAF’s Prevention Program experienced a 77% increase in youth participation over the previous year.

Continue following our blog for information about upcoming events as CPAF enters its 40th anniversary year in 2018!


CPAF’s Gala for Change on 9/22 Brings Together Food, Fun in Support of Building Healthy, Safer Communities Free of Family and Partner Violence

Together We Rise - Gala 2017

PRESS RELEASE:  CPAF’s Gala for Change on 9/22 Brings Together Food, Fun in Support of Building Healthy, Safer Communities Free of Family and Partner Violence

Chefs from Several of LA’s Finest Restaurants Share Their Talents for the Cause
General Admission Tickets at Early Bird Rate of $150, Available Through Aug. 22 While Supplies Last – Click Here to Purchase Tickets

 

August 11, 2017 (LOS ANGELES, Calif.) – Tickets are now available for the Center for the Pacific Asian Family’s (CPAF’s) 39th Anniversary Gala for Change on Friday, September 22, 2017 at the Los Angeles River Center & Gardens.

The evening features a food tasting reception hosted by premier local culinary partners, a silent auction, and a program and award ceremony, followed by live music entertainment from “The Inspiration”. Proceeds benefit Center for the Pacific Asian Family (CPAF), a nonprofit whose mission is to build healthy and safe communities by addressing the root causes and the consequences of family violence and violence against women. CPAF is committed to meeting the specific cultural and language needs of Asian Pacific Islander (API) women and their families. The event’s Leadership Sponsors include Anthony Caminiti, Cathay Bank, East West Bank and Nossaman LLP.

More than 10 of Southern California’s finest restaurants serve as Culinary Partners by donating their time and talent to prepare special dishes for the reception. Returning Culinary Partners include Barbara Jean LA, Chicas Tacos, The Guild, House of An, Osteria Vicario, Phorage, TikiFish, with Peking Tavern serving cocktails and Café Dulce providing desserts. New Culinary Partners include Bone Kettle, Commerson, and Emporium Thai.

General Admission ticket prices begin at $150 (Early Bird rate through August 22, while supplies last). Reserved seating tickets are available at $500. To purchase tickets for this year’s event, visit the CPAF ticket page. A complete list of sponsors and culinary partners is on the gala event page.

The gala’s theme, “Together We Rise”, celebrates the integration this year of CPAF and Asian Pacific Women’s Center (APWC), a nonprofit dedicated to providing a safe haven and support services for women and children who are survivors of domestic violence. CPAF and APWC share the same vision of an Asian and Pacific Islander community that is free from violence and both organizations provide services that are sensitive to the cultural and language needs of Asian and Pacific Islander survivors of violence and their families.

“The integration enhances our capacity to serve the diverse Asian & Pacific Islander communities in Los Angeles. At the gala, we will celebrate our united efforts and pay tribute to APWC’s legacy,” said Debra Suh, CPAF’s executive director.

The gala will be emceed by award-winning news anchor, David Ono, and CPAF will present its “Champion for Change” awards to:

  • Susan Hirasuna, a volunteer who has worked tirelessly on behalf of CPAF
  • Kirkland & Ellis LLP and Nixon & Peabody LLP for their pro-bono legal services

For information on how to become a sponsor, contact CPAF’s development team at development@cpaf.info or (323) 653-4045, ext. 334.

# # #

About Center for the Pacific Asian Family (CPAF)

Founded in 1978, CPAF established the first multi-lingual and multi-cultural hotline, emergency shelter, and transitional housing in the United States to specialize in serving Asian and Pacific Islander (API) survivors of domestic and sexual violence. Today, CPAF responds to thousands of crisis calls on its 24-hour hotline in 30 API languages and shelters hundreds of survivors and children, in addition to providing community prevention programs. For more information about CPAF, visit www.NurturingChange.org or call 1-800-339-3940.

 

Stay Connected with Center for the Pacific Asian Family on social media.

FacebookFacebook.com/CenterforthePacificAsianFamily

Follow us on Twitter and Instagram: @CPAForg


CPAF Congratulates Project by Project on 20 Years of Service

One of CPAF’s community partners, Project by Project, is celebrating its 20th anniversary by hosting a Plate by Plate Tasting Benefit on August 5, 2017.

Project by Project’s annual Plate by Plate Tasting Benefit will mark the organization’s 20th anniversary.

 

The event will be held at the Wallis Annenberg Building at the California Science Center in the heart of Downtown Los Angeles.

 

In honor of its 20th anniversary, Project by Project is inviting all past beneficiary partners to join their organization in continuing to advance awareness of important social issues in the Los Angeles Asian and Pacific Islander community.

 

Approximately 50 restaurants and beverage purveyors from around Southern California will be in attendance and supporting the cause. A full list of vendors can be found on the event page.

 

Past Plate by Plate events have featured a non-profit organization based on a theme or issue that addresses current needs in the Asian American community. CPAF was selected as a partner in 2015 to address housing.

 

CPAF congratulates Project by Project on 20 years of developing leaders through innovative philanthropy and looks forward to attending the event in August.


What If This Happened To You?

Domestic violence can be a difficult subject to talk about when you don’t know the audience very well. But what if I showed you a story of someone who looks like you or someone you love?

Visual storytelling can be a powerful way to break through some barriers that currently exist in many communities and in particular API communities when it comes to talking about domestic violence or sexual assault (DV/SA).

CPAF’s hope is to produce a collection of stories featuring survivors from various Asian and Pacific Islander (API) backgrounds. We plan to share these stories with the hope that the audience can identify with the survivor and develop a stronger personal conviction to help end DV/SA in their community. We also hope the videos will serve as empowering tools for other survivors, leading them to seek help or to share their personal journeys as well.

We are currently seeking API survivors to be featured for the upcoming Survivor Series episodes. Please contact us if you feel led to share your story with others in this way.

-Christine Lee


Statewide Training Held on How to Be Culturally Responsive

The Center for the Pacific Asian Family (CPAF) helped launch a pilot training series to help strengthen cultural responsiveness practices across California. As an organization that has been dedicated to helping Asian and Pacific Islander survivors facing cultural and linguistic barriers, it was a fitting task for CPAF to partner with other agencies in a joint mission to eliminate all forms of violence.

MYLAR Training in Petaluma, CA
Photos Courtesy of Everyday Impact Consulting

Six organizations met in January 2017 to collaborate on an unprecedented model of learning. Since then, the group has been traveling across the state to bring together service providers in an effort to increase access to victim services. This project, known as the MYLAR (Multi-Year Language Access Resources) Collaborative, is being led by My Sister’s House and Everyday Impact Consulting. Asian Pacific Institute on Gender-Based Violence (API-GBV), Center for the Pacific Asian Family (CPAF), Korean American Family Services (KFAM) and Mujeres Unidas y Activas (MUA) round out the group.

This exercise is called Blanketed By Blame and is designed to help participants see the structures that can cause harm and how they can be different

The training location alternates each month from NorCal to SoCal to cities in between. Adopting a diversity framework, enhancing leadership/budget strategies, and increasing language access at each workplace are examples of what participants learn in reference to serving victims of crime more effectively throughout the state.

The MYLAR training includes many styles of learning. Session three is a panel discussion on budgeting and staffing for cultural responsiveness

The training is free and open to any organization or government/social service agency that is willing to reflect on its current practices and be open to making necessary improvements to better serve its population. Post-training technical assistance can also be provided. 

Here is the current list for upcoming dates and regions:

8/24/2017 (Thursday) – Alameda / Contra Costa

8/25/2017 (Friday) – San Jose

9/14/2017 (Thursday) – Bakersfield

9/15/2017 (Friday) – Fresno

11/2/2017 (Thursday) – Ontario / Riverside

12/8/2017 (Friday) – San Diego

1/25/2018 (Thursday) – Chico

1/26/2018 (Friday) – Sacramento

To RSVP, please email Sherrie Calibo at sherrie@everydayimpactconsulting.com.

This project is made possible by the California Office of Emergency Services and the Office for Victims of Crime.

This blog was written by Christine Lee, CPAF’s Community Engagement Manager


CPAF at LA Galaxy’s Asian Pacific Islanders Night

Thank you soccer fans for supporting CPAF at LA Galaxy’s game celebrating Asians and Pacific Islanders! The home team will be donating a portion of its special ticket sales back to CPAF.

Here are some pictures of supporters who came out to watch the Galaxy make a comeback and tie with the Fire on May 6th.