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A Year in Review: CPAF’s 2017 Annual Report

On behalf of everyone at Center for the Pacific Asian Family, THANK YOU! CPAF would not be able to provide its prevention, intervention, shelter, outreach and community engagement services without the generous support of our funders.

Head over to Resources to view our latest Annual Report for fiscal year 2016-2017.

After more than 17 years as partners serving survivors of domestic violence, CPAF and Asian Pacific Women’s Center (APWC) integrated to enhance our capacity to serve the diverse Asian and Pacific Islander communities of Southern California.

As a unified organization, we look forward to continuing to support survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault through linguistically-appropriate and culturally-specific services. Thank you for your generosity as we embark on our new chapter together.

FY 2016-17 Annual Report Highlights:

– In December 2016, CPAF’s Community Center moved to a larger facility in a more easily-accessible Mid-Wilshire location.

– In December 2016, CPAF completed a comprehensive renovation of its Emergency Shelter facility’s kitchen.

– In March 2017, CPAF integrated with sister agency APWC, adding 24 beds to its Transitional Program.

– This year, CPAF helped lead the movement to increase language access and build capacity in the community, both locally and state-wide.

o The City of Los Angeles selected CPAF to implement a project to increase language access for limited English speaking survivors at partner domestic violence organizations, and to strengthen CPAF’s Language Bank of bilingual volunteers, who support translation and interpretation needs of partner agencies.

o CPAF is one of six partners in the Multi-Year Language Access Resources (MYLAR) Project, which provides state-wide trainings for participants to learn how to adopt a diversity framework, enhance leadership and budget strategies, and increase language access at their workplace, all in reference to serving victims of crime more effectively throughout the state.

– CPAF’s Prevention Program experienced a 77% increase in youth participation over the previous year.

Continue following our blog for information about upcoming events as CPAF enters its 40th anniversary year in 2018!


CPAF Congratulates Project by Project on 20 Years of Service

One of CPAF’s community partners, Project by Project, is celebrating its 20th anniversary by hosting a Plate by Plate Tasting Benefit on August 5, 2017.

Project by Project’s annual Plate by Plate Tasting Benefit will mark the organization’s 20th anniversary.

 

The event will be held at the Wallis Annenberg Building at the California Science Center in the heart of Downtown Los Angeles.

 

In honor of its 20th anniversary, Project by Project is inviting all past beneficiary partners to join their organization in continuing to advance awareness of important social issues in the Los Angeles Asian and Pacific Islander community.

 

Approximately 50 restaurants and beverage purveyors from around Southern California will be in attendance and supporting the cause. A full list of vendors can be found on the event page.

 

Past Plate by Plate events have featured a non-profit organization based on a theme or issue that addresses current needs in the Asian American community. CPAF was selected as a partner in 2015 to address housing.

 

CPAF congratulates Project by Project on 20 years of developing leaders through innovative philanthropy and looks forward to attending the event in August.


Statewide Training Held on How to Be Culturally Responsive

The Center for the Pacific Asian Family (CPAF) helped launch a pilot training series to help strengthen cultural responsiveness practices across California. As an organization that has been dedicated to helping Asian and Pacific Islander survivors facing cultural and linguistic barriers, it was a fitting task for CPAF to partner with other agencies in a joint mission to eliminate all forms of violence.

MYLAR Training in Petaluma, CA
Photos Courtesy of Everyday Impact Consulting

Six organizations met in January 2017 to collaborate on an unprecedented model of learning. Since then, the group has been traveling across the state to bring together service providers in an effort to increase access to victim services. This project, known as the MYLAR (Multi-Year Language Access Resources) Collaborative, is being led by My Sister’s House and Everyday Impact Consulting. Asian Pacific Institute on Gender-Based Violence (API-GBV), Center for the Pacific Asian Family (CPAF), Korean American Family Services (KFAM) and Mujeres Unidas y Activas (MUA) round out the group.

This exercise is called Blanketed By Blame and is designed to help participants see the structures that can cause harm and how they can be different

The training location alternates each month from NorCal to SoCal to cities in between. Adopting a diversity framework, enhancing leadership/budget strategies, and increasing language access at each workplace are examples of what participants learn in reference to serving victims of crime more effectively throughout the state.

The MYLAR training includes many styles of learning. Session three is a panel discussion on budgeting and staffing for cultural responsiveness

The training is free and open to any organization or government/social service agency that is willing to reflect on its current practices and be open to making necessary improvements to better serve its population. Post-training technical assistance can also be provided. 

Here is the current list for upcoming dates and regions:

8/24/2017 (Thursday) – Alameda / Contra Costa

8/25/2017 (Friday) – San Jose

9/14/2017 (Thursday) – Bakersfield

9/15/2017 (Friday) – Fresno

11/2/2017 (Thursday) – Ontario / Riverside

12/8/2017 (Friday) – San Diego

1/25/2018 (Thursday) – Chico

1/26/2018 (Friday) – Sacramento

To RSVP, please email Sherrie Calibo at sherrie@everydayimpactconsulting.com.

This project is made possible by the California Office of Emergency Services and the Office for Victims of Crime.

This blog was written by Christine Lee, CPAF’s Community Engagement Manager


You Matter

Two Words That Can Change a Life

Elaine Mayumi Whitefeather and CPAF's Community Engagement Manager Christine Lee
Elaine Mayumi Whitefeather and CPAF’s Community Engagement Manager Christine Lee

“You Matter.” Those two words changed Elaine Mayumi Whitefeather’s life when she thought she hit rock bottom.

Elaine’s first memories of surviving childhood abuse, racial violence and sexual assault traced her back to when she was only three years old. Her perpetrators included her own father, people from a religious institution and strangers. She grew up during the height of racism when being of mixed races (Black, Native American, and Japanese) meant not being treated as an equal in America. Elaine noted that she was 10% white, but no one addressed this fact and treated her as a third-class citizen. She was told that God didn’t listen to her prayers, so she learned to rely solely on herself every time she faced any abuse or discrimination.

Elaine recalled a day when she was molested, raped and severely injured by multiple men. When she eventually stumbled home with two broken feet, her mom told her to not let her father see her in such a disgraceful state. “I learned to put makeup on that day,” she said. “I never learned to put on makeup to look pretty. I wore makeup to cover up my bruises.” There was no one to comfort Elaine or to simple tell her that what was happening was wrong.

Elaine Mayumi Whitefeather addresses the Blue Shield of California Foundation's invited guests at the Peer-Led Institute in Berkeley, CA
Elaine Mayumi Whitefeather shares her story in Berkeley, CA

When Elaine was 20-years-old, she had 33 arrests and a couple of failed suicide attempts. “I was afraid of living,” said Elaine. “Death meant the end of it all. No more fear. Death was peace to me.” However appealing the idea may have been, suicide was not an option for her on the day she decided to drown herself in a river.

Elaine said she felt someone touch her shoulders as she was walking into the riverbed. She turned around and saw a white man with tears in his eyes. He told her the two words that planted a seed in her heart. “You matter.” It was then that she realized that she had to value herself in order to save herself.

The man she met that day happened to be a visiting professor. He called a professor from her university and told him that there was a girl with a broken heart and a wounded spirit that they need to support. He built a bridge for her to get out of the darkness. It was from there that her healing journey began.

Elaine Mayumi Whitefeather addresses a room filled with invited guests of the Blue Shield of California Foundation
Elaine Mayumi Whitefeather addresses a room filled with invited guests of the Blue Shield of California Foundation

Decades later, Elaine Mayumi Whitefeather has worked tirelessly in human service work, dedicating a majority of her time in the field of domestic violence. Elaine received a standing ovation after her speech at the Communities Empowered for Systems Change, A Peer-Led Institute presented by the Culturally Responsive Domestic Violence Network.

CPAF took part in this two-day gathering in Berkeley, CA made possible by the Blue Shield of California Foundation. CPAF and other agencies exchanged their experiences and ideas in working with marginalized communities. The foundation launched the Culturally Responsive Domestic Violence Network in 2012 to support underserved communities that are often overlooked.

Stories like Elaine’s resonated with a majority of those in the audience, as we were reminded that roughly 80% of the attendees were domestic violence survivors themselves. “Social justice always starts by those who were affected,” Elaine said. “Domestic violence isn’t something you get over. Your power is in your pain. Your pain will lead you to your greatest purpose if you follow it all the way through.”

Elaine’s life exemplifies how a person can transform his/her negative experiences into opportunities of empowerment. We at CPAF came out of the meeting re-energized and re-focused. We are here to continue our work to encourage and build bridges in support of our API families. Our goal is to have more survivors like Elaine share their stories and help end domestic violence in their communities.

CPAF Group at Blue Shield of California Foundation meeting in Berkeley, CA
CPAF Group in Berkeley, CA